BioSpawn's 4 1/2-inch PlasmaTail

BioSpawn's 4 1/2-inch PlasmaTail
A 4 1/2-inch BioSpawn’s green-pumpkin PlasmaTail affixed to a chartreuse 1/32-ounce mushroom-style jig.

When we were working on a gear guide about BioSpawn Lure Company’s ExoStick, their finesse-size soft-plastic worm caught our eye, and we immediately solicited information about it.


Straightaway, Josh Slawkin, Eli Rosenberg, and Andrew Schreiber at BioSpawn Lures and Catch Co. answered our questions and sent several green-pumpkin 4 1/2-inch PlasmaTails for us to examine, measure, work with, and describe. They also put us in touch with a member of BioSpawn’s pro staff.

Slawkin told us that the PlasmaTail was introduced to the angling world in 2013. In addition to manufacturing a 4 1/2-incher, they manufacture a 6 1/2-incher.

Our measurements indicate that it is exactly 4 1/2 inches long.


Its first 3 1/2 inches is shaped somewhat like a baseball bat.

The head of it resembles the end of the anterior section of an earthworm. Its head is three-sixteenths of an inch wide with a circumference of about nine-sixteenths of an inch.

Its torso is cylinder shaped and devoid of segments and a clitellum. At the torso’s widest spot, it is a quarter of an inch wide with a circumference of 1 1/16 inches, and this area is situated from seven-eighths of an inch to 1 1/2 inches from the tip of its head.


The dimensions of the torso decreases as it extends into the middle portions of its posterior. And at the section, which is 3 3/16 inches from the tip of the head, the torso is an eighth of an inch wide with a circumference of a half of an inch.

As the torso approaches the end of its posterior section, it gradually begins to increase in size. The posterior is donned with a pointed and cone-shaped cap, which is a quarter of an inch long and five-sixteenths of an inch wide at it widest spot with a circumference of thirteen-sixteenths of an inch.

Its epidermis is smooth, but there is a three-sixteenths of an inch by a nine-sixteenths of an inch stretch that is embossed with the word BioSpawn. And there is also a minor eye socket that is a quarter of an inch long and one-sixteenth of an inch wide on each side of its anterior section, and each socket begins about one-sixteenth of an inch from the tip of the anterior section.

It is available in the following colors: Bama Bug, Black Blue Flake/Blue, Fluorescent Shad/Green Soda, Green Pumpkin, Green Pumpkin/Plasma, Green Purple Gold Flake/Plasma, Green Soda/Peach, Junebug/Plasma, Motor Oil, Ox Blood/Peach, Purple Fire, Red Bug, Sprayed Grass, and Watermelon Red Flake/Red.

It is buoyant and impregnated with salt and a scent that is called BioScent, which consists of anise, amino acids, and fish oils.

A package of 10 costs $5.29. And they are packed in a state-of-the-art clear-plastic container that keeps the PlasmaTail straight as an arrow.

Endnotes

(1) Here is a link to BioSpawn Lure Company’s website: https://biospawn.com/products/plasmatail.

(2) Seth Feider of New Market, Minnesota, is a member of BioSpawn’s pro staff. He is a veteran guide and successful tournament angler. Nowadays he spends a lot of time competing on the Bassmaster Elite circuit.

Here is a link to website that has a YouTube that features Feider and some of his insights about the PlasmaTail https://thebasscast.com/how-to-use-a-stick-bait-to-imitate-suspended-shad-mystery-tackle-box-september-152017/.

In this YouTube, Feider explains how he employed a green-purple-gold-flake/plasma PlasmaTail that he rigged Texas-style on a drop-shot rig and used it around thick patches of submerged vegetation at the Bassmaster Elite tournament at Lake St. Clair, Michigan, on Aug. 24-27, 2017. This tactic helped him catch 15 smallmouth bass that weighed 57 pounds, 11 ounces.

(3) According to the folks at BioSpawn, the PlasmaTail works well on a drop-shot rig, split-shot rig, and shaky-head jig. Midwest finesse anglers, however, will opt for a small mushroom-style jig with an exposed hook. When the 4 1/2-inch PlasmaTail is affixed to a small mushroom-style jig, as exhibited in the photograph above, Midwest finesse anglers will be able to present it to their black bass quarries by employing the six standard Midwest finesse retrieves or slight variations of those retrieves. Here is a link to a Midwest Finesse column that explains how to employ those retrieves: http://www.in-fisherman.com/editorial/six-midwest-finesse-retrieves/153946.

(4) Here is a link to our Midwest Finesse column about BioSpawn’s ExoStick: http://www.in-fisherman.com/editorial/biospawn-lure-companys-exostick/329692.

(5) Here is a link to our gear guide that features BioSpawn’s four-inch ExoSwim: https://www.in-fisherman.com/editorial/biospawns-exoswim/357382.

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